Archive for the ‘Electrical’ Category

Chandeliers and Tears of Joy!

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Our team member Rigo with the happy couple.

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Our team member Rigo carefully installs a 100-plus-year-old chandelier

We recently received a call from a sweet couple that let us know they needed a chandelier repaired and hung. We instructed her that we would find someone to repair it and that we would hang it. While we were talking she tells us about when she was a child and how she would go to her grandmothers for the holidays and would stare in awe at this 100-plus-year-old chandelier. So after many years in storage she finally had somewhere to hang it. She was crying tears of joy when she was able to flip the switch… while on the other hand we were sweating bullets.

Four Things You Should Never Do To Your Home

Inexperienced plumber trying to repair an electric water heater

Calling a professional can save you time, money and a possible headache

  1. WORK ON YOUR OWN PLUMBING, first off because I absolutely hate plumbing work. I can work on A/C and electrical all day long but ask me to change the smallest little plumbing thing and I’m at the hardware store 15 time before I even start. Not to mention the disaster that could result. Trust me it’s cheaper to hire a plumber.
  2. DON’T DO YOUR OWN ELECTRICAL, this might sound like it’s self serving but think about it this way. Think about what you do or did for a living. Now imagine the average person trying to do what you did…let’s say you were a boat mechanic. Would you go out on a boat that the average Joe repaired, with little or no experience? Again it’s usually always better and safer to hire the right professional.
  3. DON’T DO YOUR OWN A/C REPAIR. Please change your filters, but when it comes to the rest – see numbers 1 and 2 above.
  4. DON’T LEAVE YOUR HOME FOR MORE THAN A DAY WITHOUT TURNING THE WATER OFF. If you are going away turn your water off. The damage that can result from leaking pipes is incredible. I was at a home that the occupants had left for a long weekend, a pipe had burst in the third floor, the damage to this home looked like a bomb went off.

So I covered four things to never do to your home, but please for the sake of your family, check your smoke detectors on a monthly basis. Smoke detectors save lives, but only when they are working. A good way to remember is check them every time you pay your electrical bill.

Thanks for reading,

Bryan

Bryan and Todd Hayes are the owners of a Sanibel Air Conditioning company, as well as an electrical contracting company here on Sanibel.

Check our our website at www.sanibelair.com.

Electrical Safety for Older Adults

SAMSUNGElectrical safety is important to me, so I’d like to help spread the word.  You’ve probably heard me mention the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) in the past, or you might even know of it without my help. Did you know that older adults (65+) are at a higher risk of being injured, or worse from home fires? The reason behind this are cooking-related fires, electrical malfunctions and failures that are associated with lighting and heating equipment. Identifying these causes and understanding how to avoid them is the surest bet at prevention and maintaining a safe environment, especially if someone lives alone.

Here are some helpful tips to keep you and your home free of electrical hazards.

  • Keep your electrical panel easily accessible; don’t block it with furniture or put things in the path that allows you to get to it. If there is an emergency, you can quickly reach it to turn off power
  • Replace fuses and circuit breakers with proper sizes and amperage; make sure your panel is properly labeled. It also helps to upgrade your breakers to AFCI Arc Fault Circuit Interrupters which can detect an unintended electrical arc and automatically shut off power
  • Electrical outlets should not buzz, crackle, be warm, or overloaded with appliances; test your ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCI outlets) once a month
  • Regularly check wires, cord and plugs for wear and damage; extension cords are only meant to be used temporarily
  • Install and check smoke alarms regularly

You can find additional information and some very helpful videos at http://www.esfi.org/ and learn about fire safety.

As always, thanks for reading,

Bryan

Bryan Hayes, along with his brother Todd, is a co-owner of a Sanibel Air & Electric company on Sanibel, FL. Bryan can be reached at Bryan@Sanibelair.com

 

Christmas Lights and Safety

xmas lightsThe holidays are on everyone’s mind, and I’m sure that I’m not alone in calling it my favorite time of the year. Now that Thanksgiving has passed, everyone is putting up their beautiful trees, and the more dedicated of us are stringing up those bright, colorful lights around their properties. So this is that time of year for me to talk electrical safety again. So, how many Christmas lights can you plug into that one receptacle on your lanai?  Perhaps some of you are familiar with the movie National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation? (I just can’t resist the reference). Even though Clark Griswold’s intentions to make everything perfect for the holidays were good-natured and sweet,  but his idea to turn his house into a Christmas light extravaganza that forced the local power company to switch on their auxiliary nuclear generator – not so much. Clark boasted that he had used 250 strands of lights with 100 bulbs in each one totaling a 25,000 bulb display inferno that only added to the disastrous holiday scenario that didn’t quite go as well as Clark had intended. Now, with proper electrical expertise and good planning, it’s possible to create such enormous light displays, but before you get ahead of yourself and create a situation where your circuit board is overwhelmed or you create unsafe electrical conditions in and around your home, keep in mind this: You can only put (3) 100’ strands of lights on each 15 amp plug – that’s it.  Note: most of your receptacles are a minimum of 15 amps.  It’s the safest way to go. Now if you do decide to go all out and plan out and extravagant holiday display, you might want to give me a call before you do that.

Happy Holidays from your Sanibel Air and Sanctuary Island Electric team!

As always thanks for reading,

Bryan

Bryan Hayes, along with his brother Todd, is a co-owner of a Sanibel Air & Electric  company on Sanibel, FL.Bryan can be reached at Bryan@Sanibelair.com

Sanibel Air & Electric Helps Fundraise for START

Here we are from left to right: Lauren Hayes, Todd and Jennifer Hayes, Eamon and Missy Sullivan (winners) and Jackie and Bryan Hayes.

Here we are from left to right: Lauren Hayes, Todd and Jennifer Hayes, Eamon and Missy Sullivan (winners) and Jackie and Bryan Hayes.

Sanibel Air & Electric, Inc. is proud to announce that its air conditioning system donated to benefit the fifth annual Cracker Fest that took place on Friday, November 8th, 2013, helped raise $5,500 for Sanibel-Captiva chapter of Solutions to Avoid Red Tide (START). The winning bid was made by Eamon and Missy Sullivan who received a brand new air conditioning system, which includes installation, 16 SEER Rheem equipment, UV air treatment system, whole-house filtration system, Honeywell digital thermostat, labor, and permits. The package was valued at over $8,000. This is the fourth year that the company has supported this cause. The event includes a dinner, live music and dancing, live auction and raffles.

The annual event benefits START. The organization is a state-wide non-profit foundation with a mission to improve the quality of our marine waters through research, public education and programs that restore marine habitat and preserve marine species.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

“This year’s Cracker Fest was a blast and we are very happy with our sponsorship opportunity. Not only does the event help fund important initiatives that raise public awareness and benefit our local environment, it also brings together a great crowd,” said Bryan Hayes, co-owner of Sanibel Air & Electric, Inc. “Our family looks forward to attending it every year. Eamon and Missy took home a really great package and we look forward to working with

Jackie, Bryan and Lauren Hayes.

Jackie, Bryan and Lauren Hayes.

them soon. We thank them for helping us support START.”

Proceeds from the event will continue funding the Coastal Classroom program for Lee County schools, and the Sustainable Seafood Program – “Seafood Savvy,” an

d other programs that benefit the local marine environment. In addition to these programs, plans are in the works to create a beach monitoring network on Sanibel and Captiva that will provide knowledge of specific beach conditions during a red tide event, and the possibility of creating a marine studies scholarship with a portion of the 2012 proceeds. The local chapter’s latest initiative is to fund

research on water quality around Sanibel and Captiva Islands. This project examines the nutrient contents of Caloosahatchee discharge waters and their relation to red tide blooms. It will also study the extent to which red tide effects certain organisms, including seabirds, sea turtles, and fish.

Sanibel Air & Electric, Inc. was started in 1988 and has maintained their promise to provide the best local service around for over 22 years. The company is highly active in their community, and participate or contribute to several charitable causes throughout the year.

Sanibel Air & Electric Sponsors Cracker Fest

Sanibel Air & Electric, Inc. is proud to announce that it has chosen to become one of the top level sponsors in the fifth annual Cracker Fest scheduled to take place on Friday, November 8th, 2013. The donation includes a brand new air conditioning system, which includes installation, and is valued at over $6,000. This is the fourth year that the company has supported this cause. The event includes a dinner, live music and dancing, live auction and raffles.

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Todd and Bryan Hays, co-owners of Sanibel Air & Electric, Inc.

The annual event benefits Sanibel-Captiva chapter of Solutions to Avoid Red Tide (START). The organization is a state-wide non-profit foundation with a mission to improve the quality of our marine waters through research, public education and programs that restore marine habitat and preserve marine species.

“We are always grateful to have the ability to do what we can, and look forward to another great Cracker Fest. Not only does it help sponsor important initiatives that raise public awareness and benefit our local environment, it also brings together a great crowd,” said Todd Hayes, co-owner of Sanibel Air & Electric, Inc. “It’s a fun and laid-back event and we have fun attending it every year. For those of us who live and work on the islands, it’s absolutely necessary that we continue to support those who raise awareness and funds that help causes that benefit all of us.”

Proceeds from the event will continue funding the Coastal Classroom program for Lee County schools, and the Sustainable Seafood Program – “Seafood Savvy,” and other programs that benefit the local marine environment. In addition to these programs, plans are in the works to create a beach monitoring network on Sanibel and Captiva that will provide knowledge of specific beach conditions during a red tide event, and the possibility of creating a marine studies scholarship with a portion of the 2012 proceeds. The local chapter’s latest initiative is to fund research on water quality around Sanibel and Captiva Islands. This project examines the nutrient contents of Caloosahatchee discharge waters and their relation to red tide blooms. It will also study the extent to which red tide effects certain organisms, including seabirds, sea turtles, and fish. For more information on the Fourth Annual Cracker Fest and sponsorship opportunities, please visit: http://start1.org/news/fifth-annual-san-cap-cracker-fest-2013/

Sanibel Air & Electric, Inc. was started in 1988 and has maintained their promise to provide the best local service around for over 22 years. The company is highly active in their community, and participate or contribute to several charitable causes throughout the year.

October is the Month for Fire Prevention Week

Beach House PDFSince I just often talk about electricity and safety a couple in my articles, I want to highlight that this is the month of the annual Fire Prevention Week which took place October 6-12, 2013. Their goal is to raise public awareness with this year’s theme being “Prevent Kitchen Fires,” to emphasize that more fires start in the kitchen than in any other part of the home, and to teach people how to keep cooking fires from starting in the first place.

Here are some interesting facts about home fires:

  • In 2011, U.S. fire departments responded to 370,000 home structure fires. These fires caused 13,910 civilian injuries, 2,520 civilian deaths, $6.9 billion in direct damage.
  • On average, seven people die in U.S. home fires per day.
  • Cooking is the leading cause home fires and home fire injuries, followed heating equipment. Smoking is a leading cause of civilian home fire deaths.
  • Two of every five home fires start in the kitchen.
  • Unattended cooking was a factor in 34% of reported home cooking fires.
  • Two-thirds of home cooking fires started with ignition of food or other cooking materials.
  • Ranges accounted for the 58% of home cooking fire incidents. Ovens accounted for 16%.
  • Children under five face a higher risk of non-fire burns associated with cooking than being burned in a cooking fire.
  • Microwave ovens are one of the leading home products associated with scald burn injuries not related to fires. Nearly half (44%) of the microwave oven injuries seen at emergency rooms in 2011 were scald burns.
  • Clothing was the item first ignited in less than 1% of home cooking fires, but these incidents accounted for 16% of the cooking fire deaths.

I encourage everyone to take the time to talk about these causes with everyone in their families. All of these accidents can be avoided through education and proper use. You can find additional information at http://www.esfi.org/ and learn about fire safety.

As always, thanks for reading,

Bryan

Bryan Hayes, along with his brother Todd, is a co-owner of a Sanibel Air & Electric company on Sanibel, FL. Bryan can be reached at Bryan@Sanibelair.com

Sanibel Air and Sanctuary Island Electric Merge

PrintIt’s official, Sanibel Air Conditioning, Inc. and Sanctuary Island Electric, Inc. have merged to become Sanibel Air and Electric, Inc. The family-owned businesses got its start in 1988 when founder Dan Hayes moved to Sanibel from New Jersey and opened Sanibel Repair Service and began providing quality heating and air service to those living on the islands. Hayes was later joined by his sons Bryan Hayes and Todd Hayes who would eventually take over running the business after he retired in 2006.

Since coming on board, the brothers made a few changes. Sanibel Repair Service was officially renamed as Sanibel Air Conditioning in 1998 and Sanctuary Island Electric was started by the brothers in 2007 to help maintain the high volume of electrical repair requests, and allow them to establish a new business.

Today the company has grown to 12 employees and 8 service trucks, but its vision, as coined by Dan Hayes, remains the same, ”To provide our customers with quality, reliable service, being there when you need us, and remembering our customer’s names.”

“When we first started Sanctuary Island Electric, we wanted to give the business a chance to get settled in on its own. And now we decided that the time has come for us to merge them because we had achieved what we had hoped to – a solid business with a good reputation and a necessary service on the islands,” said Bryan Hayes, co-owner of Sanibel Air and Electric. “We are still the same company, still owned and run by the same family, and still the only island-based air conditioning business. We have been servicing the island communities for over 25 years, and we are hoping to continue providing them with great service when they need it.”

The Importance of Having Shade

treesYou know, I’ve had this thought that occurred to me recently. Just the other day I was grilling on my back porch and thinking about how hot it was. So then I thought, is my memory just deceiving me, or did it really get hotter in the recent years? I then thought about the days before Charley, and I know it seems like it was a long time ago, but I remember August 13th, 2004 like it was yesterday. It was the day that Mother Nature reminded us that she’s the boss and brought us that hurricane. I have a great deal of memories that flood my mind when the topic comes up.  One of the most vivid of all though is in the following weeks how hot it was.  After power was restored we received a great deal of calls indicating that there must be something wrong with their air conditioner.  It just isn’t keeping up anymore.  We ran call after call and came across the same issue.  We finally came to the conclusion that the lack of shade created by Charlie’s tree pruning had a huge effect on how our air conditioners ran.  Another thought is that with a great deal less trees to block the sun from hitting the ground, buildings and streets more heat was absorbed and stayed around a great deal longer.  Remember that canopy of trees along Periwinkle Way just after Casa Ybel Rd?

I spend a great deal of time suggesting that my readers do things here and do better insulate their homes, use curtains on the southern-facing sides of their homes to prevent unnecessary heat from entering. Well, trees also play an essential part in blocking the unnecessary heat around our properties, this was especially true in the days before air conditioning. The City of Sanibel has done some great work with the Periwinkle Way Restoration Project to help restore much of the flora that had been lost and I’m once again seeing the canopy return in parts over the our city’s arterial road. It’s not completely restored yet, but it’s nice to see shade on the bike paths again.

So, have you lost trees around your house after Charley? It’s never too late to replant. It may not give you much now, but in a few years it will bring its rewards.  There are some fast growing shade tree options out there that can bring desired results in a shorter time period. Just nothing exotic or invasive please.

As always thanks for reading,

Bryan

Bryan Hayes, along with his brother Todd, is a co-owner of a Sanibel Air Conditioning company on Sanibel, FL. They also own and operate an island-based electrical service company Sanctuary Island Electric, Inc. Bryan can be reached at Bryan@Sanibelair.com

Surge Protection

outletSince we appear to be stuck in the never-ending the rainy season, and this week was a good reminder what that feels like, I think it’s always a good time to talk about surge protection. You may or may not be surprised by this, but the number one cause of downtime for your central cooling system is not refrigerant related. The most common cause is actually electrical with the average home experiencing over 300 surges per year.

For those of us who live on Sanibel, we know that it’s a constant battle for our power company to keep the grid in good working order. Many major home appliances, including our air conditioners, rely more on solid state electronics to operate than ever before.  While the luxury of it all might be very convenient, it still comes with a price. These controls are also more susceptible to power fluctuations than ever before.  So to reference the title, the way to protect your expensive investment is to use surge protection.

Surge protection can be achieved through many different ways.  You can buy those little surge protection strips for your pluggable appliances and most stores. However, for the larger stuff such as your air conditioner, you are would need to have an electrician install an inline surge protection on the electrical feed. If you really like the idea, you can even take this one step further and have a surge protection system installed for your entire house. That will cover all the circuits in your home.

As you may already know, I like talking about saving money. Surge protection is an additional cost of course, but spending some money now can definitely save you from spending significantly more and the hassle later. Consider that an investment.

As always, thanks for reading,

Bryan

Bryan Hayes, along with his brother Todd, is a co-owner of a Sanibel Air Conditioning company on Sanibel, FL. They also own and operate an island-based electrical service company Sanctuary Island Electric, Inc. Bryan can be reached at Bryan@Sanibelair.com